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Too Late For Tears

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This film is pure Noir. Lizabeth Scott and Arthur Kennedy are a couple who receive a satchel full of money that was intended for someone else (Dan Duryea). He wants to turn the cash over to the authorities; she wants to keep it—no matter what the consequenses:

“Jane, Jane, what’s happening to us—what’s happening. The money sits down there in an old leather bag and yet it’s tearing us apart. It’s poison, Jane. It’s changing you, it’s changing both of us.”

“Chances like this are never offered twice. This is it. I’ve been waiting for it—dreaming of it all my life, even when I was a kid.”
Lizabeth Scott and Arthur Kennedy are a couple who receive a satchel full of money that was intended for someone else (Dan Duryea). He wants to turn the cash over to the authorities; she wants to keep it—no matter what the consequenses:

“Jane, Jane, what’s happening to us—what’s happening. The money sits down there in an old leather bag and yet it’s tearing us apart. It’s poison, Jane. It’s changing you, it’s changing both of us.”

“Chances like this are never offered twice. This is it. I’ve been waiting for it—dreaming of it all my life, even when I was a kid.”

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 The film was reissued as Killer Bait in 1955. Too Late for Tears has been in the public domain for many years; there are several different edits of the film with different running times.[1] On January 25, 2014, a restored 35mm print was premiered by the Film Noir Foundation at Noir City 12 at the Castro Theatre in San Francisco. The film was restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Film Noir Foundation. The restoration combined 35mm dupe negative elements from France with some material from surviving prints. No Blu-ray release has been announced.

Too Late for Tears is a 1949 American film noir directed by Byron Haskin and starring Lizabeth ScottDon DeFore,Dan Duryea and Arthur Kennedy. The screenplay was written by Roy Huggins, developed from a serial he wrote for the Saturday Evening Post.

 

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